In a speech Monday focused on economic policy, Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton spoke out on what she saw as the double-edged sword that characterizes startups like Uber, Airbnb or Instacart.

“This will be a fight for the Democratic nomination, and it will be hard to secure it”, said communications director Jennifer Palmieri.

“Even if she cruises through the primaries, the general election is no sure bet for Clinton”, said Paleologos.

The proposal, called the “Rising Incomes, Sharing Profits” Tax Credits, is her first economic policy roll-out of the campaign and comes days after Clinton outlined her economic platform in New York. “I’m talking about clear-eyed capitalism”, she said. But for millions, the contemporary American workplace is characterized by insecurity: insecurity that they’ll have enough work this month to pay their bills, insecurity that they’ll be able to put anything away for retirement, insecurity that an illness or family crisis won’t send them into a financial tailspin from which they can’t recover.

Under the plan, firms that share profits with their employees will get a two-year tax credit equal to 15% of the amount they share, according to the fact sheet.

“Hard-working Americans deserve to benefit from the record corporate earnings they helped produce”, Clinton said in a speech at The New School in New York City.

Comprehensive immigration reform, she said, would increase GDP by US$700 billion over the next decade.

“For 35 years Republicans have argued that if we give more wealth to those at the top by cutting their taxes and letting big corporations write their own rules, it will trickle down … to everyone else”, she railed. “Secretary Clinton, I believe, has a different view on that issue”, he said, although he omitted that as president, her husband had negotiated the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Ms. Clinton also pointed out that big banks on Wall Street shouldn’t be considered “too big too fail”. “She said people need to realize what coal has done for this country”.

“The measure of our success must be how much incomes rise for hard-working families, not just for successful CEOs and money managers”, she said.

Clinton also excoriated “shocking” misconduct in the financial industry, lamenting that few individuals were punished for their roles in precipitating the 2008 financial crisis.

Clinton better offer specifics soon, or she will be branded an enemy of innovation.

As for Clinton’s take on the lunch that included her the man posing the strongest challenge to the nomination so far, the former secretary of state showed no outward signs of concern.

Calling inequality a “drag” on the entire economy, Clinton targeted Bush directly for saying last week that Americans needed to “work longer hours” – a portion of the former Florida governor’s discussion of economic solutions that his campaign said critics have taken out of context.

Clinton also name-checked the newest entrant into the Republican presidential race, Walker, who announced his candidacy on Monday.

The Republicans on the other hand apparently have no trouble finding candidates willing to tackle subjects. Jim Webb with 1 percent each.

The topic of job creation has always been a staple of United States presidential elections, but some jobs born out of today’s on-demand economy have raised the concern of at least one candidate.